Radiometric dating daughter isotope

30 Apr

One half-life is the time it takes for ½ of the parent isotopes present in a rock or bone or shell to decay to daughter isotopes.

Parent isotopes decay to daughter isotopes at a steady, exponential rate that is constant for each pair.

The only problem is that we only know the number of daughter atoms now present, and some of those may have been present prior to the start of our clock. The reason for this is that Rb has become distributed unequally through the Earth over time.

We can see how do deal with this if we take a particular case. For example the amount of Rb in mantle rocks is generally low, i.e. The mantle thus has a low If these two independent dates are the same, we say they are concordant.

Some of these atomic arrangements are stable, and some are not.

The unstable isotopes change over time into more stable isotopes, in a process called radioactive decay.

If there were such a pair of isotopes, radiometric dating would be very simple.

Scientists can use the clocklike behavior of these isotopes to determine the age of rocks, fossils, and even some long-lived organisms.

Isotopes are forms of an element that have the same number of electrons and protons but different numbers of neutrons.

Shortly after Becquerel's find, Marie Curie, a French chemist, isolated another highly radioactive element, .

The realisation that radioactive materials emit rays indicated a constant change of those materials from one element to another.