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16 Feb

In 1921, the widow of Albert Goodwill Spalding donated his voluminous archive of baseball photographs, manuscripts and books to the Astor-Lenox and Tilden Foundation of the New York Public Library.

Spalding assembled the collection in conjunction with his release of the 1911 book and it was comprised of his own personal papers and scrapbooks and the personal archives of baseball pioneers Harry Wright and Henry Chadwick.

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Stories about the apostle are the stuff of Mormon legend, but who was the man behind the myth? Golden Kimball: The Remarkable Man Behind the Colorful Stories, Kathryn Jenkins Gordon seeks to answer that very question.

She traces Kimball's life from his birth in 1853 (he was one of 65 children born to his polygamist father, Heber C.

The Spalding Collection constituted the most significant holding of 19th century baseball artifacts and documents in existence and from 1922 through the 1970s the collection served as an important resource for historians like Charles Mears, Robert Henderson, Dr. Access to the collection also helped to establish the formal endeavor of baseball scholarship with Dr.

Seymour’s 1955 dissertation at Cornell University and the release of the ground-breaking book published by Oxford in 1961.

In the course of microfilming the collection, however, Thorn realized that a significant number of manuscripts and scrapbooks were missing from the library’s Fifth Avenue Branch.

Harry Wright, in similar fashion, bequeathed his entire baseball archive to the National League in 1895 as part of his last will and testament where he noted specifically his wish for his baseball library to serve as “a nucleus or beginning of a historical collection” to preserve the history of the game.

Spalding likely acquired the trove when he served as the National League President in 1902 and until his death in 1915 maintained Wright’s archive of photographs, scrapbooks, diaries, financial ledgers, correspondence, score books and rule books documenting Wright’s affiliations with the Cincinnati and Boston Red Stockings and the Philadelphia Nationals from 1868 through 1894.

Although he was often criticized for using speech unbecoming of a man of God, his devotion to the Lord and to the Church is undeniable.

Sacrificing everything in the name of the Father, he was a man not unacquainted with poverty, disappointment, and grief.